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SPOTLIGHT: Faculty-Scholar Collaboration

Professor Paul Yovanoff

NCLII Scholar Sarah Wilkinson

We are completing a cross-site collaboration to advance the findings from Project Intensity. The collaboration has two beneficial objectives. First, the data obtained through Project Intensity have not been thoroughly analyzed. Second, the collaboration will increase our methodological skill.

Project Intensity is an IES Intervention Development (Goal 2) grant that began in 2013 and is nearing completion. The reading intervention “Friends on the Block” is designed for students with intellectual disability. Findings are promising (Allor eta al, in review a; Allor et al, in review b;). The multiple baseline single-case research is a within-case (N=18) multiple baseline across reading levels design. The data structure includes baseline and intervention phases, with each case replicated across reading levels. Various design features offer an excellent opportunity for us to explore, (a) choice of effect-size indices, (b) choice of meta-analytic model, and (c) rescaling of the outcome measure.

Worth noting, for purposes of developing methodological skill, we are re-analyzing a second data set. Dr. Moira McKenna (a former advisee of Dr. Robert Horner at the University of Oregon) has generously offered her dissertation data for re-analysis. Moira’s 2006 dissertation (McKenna, 2006) research focused on the use of functional behavior analyses to improve reading outcomes. The data file is useful as a classic multiple baseline single-case study for modelling both case and intervention covariates. We will use current procedures to re-analyze Moira’s data.

Allor, J. H., Yovanoff, P., Al Otaiba, S., Ortiz, M. B., & Conner, C. (in review a). Literacy intervention for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities: A meta-analysis. Exceptional Children.

Allor, J. H., Gifford, D. B., Jones, F. G., Al Otaiba, S., Yovanoff, P., Ortiz, M. B., & Cheatham, J. P. (in review b). The effects of a text-centered literacy curriculum for students with intellectual disability. American Journal for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

McKenna, M. (2006). The role of function-based academic and behavior support to improve reading achievement. (Doctoral Dissertation). Retrieved from Pro-Quest (3224106).

The contents of this website were developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, #H325H140001. However, those contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. Project Officer, Celia Rosenquist.

Mental Health Services in Schools: Literature Review

It all started in St. Louis. An inspiring presentation fueled conversations with faculty and fellow scholars about the need to consider mental health-related characteristics to inform intensive interventions, thus planting the seed for collaboration. Our project, a meta-analytic review of the effects of school-based Mental Health Services for students with or at-risk for mental health disorders, has allowed us the opportunity to engage with other scholars and faculty members to explore an area of shared interests.

As scholars, we have been able to use this project to learn meta-analytic techniques with the continued support of faculty. We have worked cohesively as a team, engaging in frequent conference calls for decision-making and management of task assignments. Our mantra – to maintain high levels of communication and stay decisive in our plan of action – in addition to our complementary work styles have been driving forces for this project’s success. While we have hit obstacles along the way, we worked through challenges by drawing upon each other’s previous research experiences. In this way, we each provided leadership during different aspects of the project, capitalizing on each of our respective strengths. Finally, we have greatly appreciated the support of our faculty member mentors (Betsy Talbott and Dan Maggin), who have provided a context situated in our early-career researcher “zone of proximal development.” Betsy and Dan have provided us the space required to hone our independent research skills, while also providing guidance as needed throughout the process.

-Scholars: Skip Kumm, Sam Gesel, Caitlyn Majeika

The contents of this website were developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, #H325H140001. However, those contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. Project Officer, Celia Rosenquist.